Wednesday
Jun052013

1968 Mustang Convertible

By Vern Parker

Like many teenagers in 1979 Steve Zimmerli had a summer job. However, he did not have a driver's license, much less a car, so he hitched a ride to work each day with his father.

A traffic signal by a church in Oakton, Virginia, always seemed to turn red as they approached the intersection. As they waited for the green light to appear young Zimmerli noticed an attractive Mustang in the church parking lot.

Every day that week he admired the Mustang at the church. The next week it was gone. Surprisingly, the following week the Mustang reappeared and that was a pattern all summer long.

 

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Wednesday
Jun052013

1955 Packard Clipper Custom Constellation

By Vern Parker

From the turn of the 20th century the Packard brothers, James Ward and William Doud, insisted that parts on all Packard automobiles would be of high quality, durability and reliability.

For more than a half century those high standards served Packard well.

By 1955 the all new Packard automobile was a modern marvel. For the first time in 32 years there was no in-line eight cylinder engine offered. Instead, an all new 352-cubic-inch V-8 was offered that delivered 245 horsepower.

The fresh, new styling of the Clipper line even did away with the traditional Packard crest in the grille and replaced it with a new emblem shaped like a ship's steering wheel following the “Clipper Ship” theme.

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Monday
Jun032013

1961 Oldsmobile Dynamic 88 convertible

By Vern Parker

Over the years Mike Fogerty has owned some Ford products as well as some vehicles from General Motors. However, deep down he admits to being a Mopar man.

So how does a person who favors cars built by the Chrysler Corporation end up driving a 1961 Oldsmobile Dynamic 88 convertible?

In order to stay abreast of used car values Fogerty often peruses the classified ads in the local newspaper. It was September 2002 while looking through the classified ads that he came across an ad that caught his attention.

 

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Thursday
May302013

1936 Ford Deluxe Phaeton

By Vern Parker

It can be argued that during the decade of the 1930s Ford never made an ugly car.

In 1936 Ford manufactured 21 models with prices ranging from $510 for a two-passenger, five-window Standard coupe to $780 for a five-passenger, turtle back, Deluxe convertible sedan.

A 1936 Deluxe Phaeton had a base price of $590 for those who wanted four doors, a top that could be folded down and no side windows.

A decade or so ago Art Zimmerli was shopping for a 1936 Ford roadster when he learned of a freshly restored 1936 Ford Phaeton that was for sale. It wasn't too far from Amissville, Va. home so he went to investigate.

 

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Friday
May172013

1971 Ford Torino Halo

By Vern Parker

It's not often that a man buys the same car twice but David Claveloux has an explanation. It really wasn't the identical car.

Until he graduated from George Mason University in 1971 he motored about in a vintage Corvair.

Upon graduation Cleveloux stopped by the nearest Ford dealer to see what he could see.

He was particularly attracted to the Torino models and was seriously considering one of them when a salesman, like salesmen are wont to do, suggested that he might like the slightly more expensive Halo version of the Torino.

Like most auto manufacturers in those days the regular models were dressed up to attract a higher price. They were produced for only three months.

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