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Tuesday
Jul182017

1967 Corvette Sting Ray

By Vern Parker

Jose Rodriguez says he has long been enamored by General Motors products, especially Corvettes.

As the years passed he became more discerning and found himself especially attracted to the 1966 and 1967 model Corvettes.  Of course locating such a Corvette model in excellent condition proved to be a daunting task.

Nevertheless, Rodriguez pesisted, remaining alert for his dream car.  Then one day in 2014 he saw an ad offering a restored 1967 Corvette coupe for sale not too far from his home in northern Virginia.

The Corvette was located in Christiansburg, Virginia, so Rodriguez thought even if the car was not as advertised he would still enjoy a pleasant trip down the scenic Shenandoah valley.

Upon first seeing the black Corvette he knew his trip to investigate the car had been worthwhile.

From the four round hidden headlights to the horizontal backup light above the rear license plate the car was black, inside and out with the single exception of a splash of red highlighting the bulge on the engine hood.

It didn't take long for the seller and the buyer to come to terms and the ownership was transferred.  Rodriguez went home empty handed but returned a week later with an enclosed trailer to take possession of his coveted Corvette Sting Ray.

Beneath the engine hood is a 427-cubic-inch V-8 engine that develops 390 horsepower.  A four-speed manual transmission shifts all that power to the 15-inch red line tires at the rear of the car.

"I love the sound of the engine," Rodriguez says.

The Corvette has a distinct lack of power assisted features including steering, brakes and windows.  "It's very raw," Rodriguez says.  His car does have a radio which is mounted vertically in order to make the best use of the limited space in the cabin.  Both the 7,000 RPM tachometer and the 160 MPH speedometer are clearly visible through the three-spoke steering wheel.

The rumble of the big block engine in the Corvette comes tumbling out through the side mounted exhaust pipes between the 98-inch wheelbase.

A tinted windshield helps keep the cabin temperature under control.  Wing vent windows can be adjusted to draw fresh air inside the all black car as well.

Rodriguez has discovered that driving in modern day traffic without an outside mirror on the right side of any car can be treacherous.  He has addressed that problem with the addition of a genuine Chevrolet mirror.

Since acquiring the blacker than black Corvette he has fed the engine an exclusive diet of high octane racing fuel which keeps both the car and the owner happy.

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